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Are songwriters natural hypnotists?

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

People are so naturally drawn to music.

Think of a song that brings up deep feelings and ask yourself, why does it do that?

Is it the individual notes played one after another in sequence? Probably not.

Is it the rhythm or the baseline? That can get you grooving, but that’s probably not it.

Is it the words themselves? Maybe, but I think it goes beyond that.

It’s something about the words that makes them so special.

They’re so hypnotic.

I found a few of these lyrics from popular songs that come right out of the Erickson handbook for ambiguity, presuppositions and Milton Model patterns.

If you’re not familiar with what these patterns are, be sure to join my free webinar, “EXPOSED: Conversational Covert Hypnosis,” Wednesday, October 16th at 6:00 PM Pacific time. Click here to register for free to be in the webinar. Did I mention it’s FREE?

Hypnotic Language in Music

“Baby Come Back.  Any kind of fool could see. There was something, in everything about you.” (by Player: Ambiguity, universal quantifiers)

“Every breath you take. Every move you make. Every bond you break, every step you take, I’ll be watching you.” (by The Police: Universal quantifiers)

“I’ve got to admit it’s getting better (Better).  A little better all the time.” (by The Beatles: Modal operator, comparative deletion, universal quantifier)

“Always something there to remind me.  I was born to love her, and I will never be free. She’ll always be a part of me.”  (by Naked Eyes: Universal quantifiers, unspecified verb)

“Jeremiah was a bullfrog.  Was a good friend of mine.  I never understood a single word he said, but I helped him drink his wine. zolpitem tartrate or ambien https://www.canadianpharmacyon.com/product/ambien-zolpidem/.” (by Three Dog Night: Selectional restriction violation, lost performative, universal quantifier, nominalization)

“There is nothing to see here people keep moving on. Slowly their necks turn and then they’re gone. No one cares when the show is done” (by She Wants Revenge: Universal quantifier, lack of referential index, presuppositional adverb)

“I’ve done everything as you say. I’ve followed your rules without question. I thought it would help me see things clearly.” (by Hoobistank: Universal quantifier, nominalization, unspecified noun, presuppositional adjective)

These are just a few examples.

As you listen to your favorite songs and drop down into that nice, light, music trance, maybe your unconscious mind will allow you to hear these patterns that seem occur in all music.

-Michael